Posts Tagged ‘ islam ’

Los niños y niñas de la Escuela de Árabe

El pase de diapositivas requiere JavaScript.

Anuncios

Inicio de Ramadán, en FRAME

PATERSON, N.J. (AP) — The most ancient traditions of Islam are going high-tech, with a slew of modern offerings for those observing the holy month of Ramadan, which begins this week. Cell phone applications such as “iPray” or “iQuran” offer a beeping reminder of requisite prayer times, while the “Find Mecca” and “mosque finder” programs help the Muslim traveler in an unfamiliar city find the nearest place to pray. The applications aren’t just for Ramadan; there are Islamic-themed programs that help users find the nearest Costco offering foods prepared according to Islamic dietary rules, learn the correct Arabic pronunciations in a daily prayer, or count how many pages of the Quran they’ve read that day — all on a mobile phone. The dates of Ramadan still are determined by the lunar calendar, and calculations can differ among Islamic communities around the world. In North America, many Muslims will mark the first day of Ramadan on Wednesday. But Islam never has been at odds with innovation, said Zinnur Tabakci, who runs an Islamic religious book and gift shop in Paterson, N.J. “Islam is not against technology. Now you can do it easier, faster,” said Tabakci, who recently supplemented the strings of traditional prayer beads and religious texts he sells with a wall of mobile phone accessories to keep up with demand. (37 images)


ramadan_0811_01.jpg
An Indonesian women prays during the first night of Ramadan in Jakarta on August 10, 2010. The fasting month of Ramadan, which starts on August 11, is the ninth month of the Muslim Hijri calendar, during which the faithful abstain from eating, drinking, smoking and having sex during daylight and, in the evening, eat small meals and conduct evening prayers. AFP/ Getty Images / Adek Berry
ramadan_0811_02.jpg
In this photograph taken on August 10, 2010 an official from the State Islamic University (STAIN), uses a telescope to observe the moon after sunset from the coast of Madura in East Java province of Indonesia on the eve of Ramadan. The exact dates of the start and the end of Islam’s holy month Ramadan depend on the sighting of the new moon. Muslims observe the ninth month of the lunar Islamic calendar by abstaining from food, drink and sex from dawn until sunset during Ramadan. The fast is one of the five pillars of Islam.Indonesia has the world’s largest population of Muslims. AFP/ Getty Images / Ahmad
ramadan_0811_03.jpg
Pakistani flood-affected people sleep outside their tents at a makeshift camp in Sukkur early on August 12, 2010, on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. AFP/Getty Images / Aamir Qureshi
ramadan_0811_04.jpg
A Pakistani flood-affected woman prepares tea for family members before beginning their fast at a makeshift camp in Sukkur early on August 12, 2010, on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. The holy month of Ramadan is bringing nothing but misery for millions of Pakistanis who fled for their lives when catastrophic floods washed away their homes, villages and livelihoods. AFP/Getty Images / Aamir Qureshi
ramadan_0811_05.jpg
A woman puts on her sandals after prayer at the Darul Uloom Institute in Pembroke Pines, Fla., Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. Muslims throughout the world pray and break their fast together, on the first day of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. AP / Alan Diaz
ramadan_0811_06.jpg
Muslim men pray at the Darul Uloom Institute in Pembroke Pines, Fla., on the first day of Ramadan Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Alan Diaz
ramadan_0811_07.jpg
Muslims line up for food as they break fast after sunset August 11, 2010 at Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Virginia. Getty Images / Alex Wong
ramadan_0811_08.jpg
Local resident Ahmad Issa (R) helps his daughter Yasmine (L) to put her shoes on after having said the sunset prayer August 11, 2010 at Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Virginia. Getty Images / Alex Wong
ramadan_0811_09.jpg
Muslims say the sunset prayer August 11, 2010 at Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Virginia. Muslims around the world started their first day of fasting to observe the month long Ramadan. Getty Images / Alex Wong
ramadan_0811_10.jpg
Omanis shop at a market on the first day of Islam’s holy fasting month of Ramadan in Muscat on August 11, 2010. AFP/Getty Images / Mohammed Mahjoub
ramadan_0811_11.jpg
Saudi men and Muslim foreign workers prepare to break their fast at a mosque on the first day of Islam’s holy fasting month of Ramadan in the port city fo Jeddah on August 11, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Amer Hilabi
ramadan_0811_12.jpg
Palestinian Muslim girls hold traditional Ramadan lanterns while celebrating the at Jerusalem’s old city after breaking the fast on the first day of the Moslem holy month of Ramadan on August 11, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Ahmad Gharablia
ramadan_0811_13.jpg
Palestinians walk under colored lights as they go to the first evening prayers at the al-Aqsa mosque at Jerusalem’s old city Damascus Gate after breaking the fast on the first day of the Moslem holy month of Ramadan on August 11, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Ahmad Gharablia
ramadan_0811_14.jpg
Palestinians walk under colored lights as they go to the first evening prayers at the al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem’s Old City, after breaking the fast on the first day of the Moslem holy month of Ramadan on August 11, 2010. AFP/Getty Images / Ahmad Gharablia
ramadan_0811_15.jpg
Muslims offer prayers before the start of the holy month of Ramadan at Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, India, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Mahesh Kumar A
ramadan_0811_16.jpg
Pakistani shopkeepers prepare delicacies for the Islamic month of Ramadan, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010 in Karachi, Pakistan. AP / Fareed Khan
ramadan_0811_17.jpg
Residents and tourists crowd on a beach of Rabat on August 11, 2010 on the eve of the Ramadan beginning in the country. Ramadan today began for most Sunni Muslims as heat waves gripped many countries and leaders hoped the holy fasting month would reinforce piety and reconciliation among communities. AFP/ Getty Images / Abdelhak Senna
ramadan_0811_18.jpg
A Sudanese woman shops on the first day of the fasting month of Ramadan at the market of Umdorman, on the northern outskirts of the capital Khartoum, Sudan Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Abd Raouf
ramadan_0811_19.jpg
A Palestinian man looks at lights for sale, on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in Jerusalem’s Old City, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Tara Todras-Whitehill
ramadan_0811_20.jpg
Indian Muslims stand under a tarp to protect from rain on the eve of the fasting month of Ramadan in New Delhi on August 11, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Manpreet Romana
ramadan_0811_21.jpg
Orphans attend a briefing on the holy month of Ramadan, which is to begin Thursday in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Pavel Rahman
ramadan_0811_22.jpg
Muslim children point to the new moon ushering in the holy month of Ramadan, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Pavel Rahman
ramadan_0811_23.jpg
Afghans take food to break their fast on the first day of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan at a mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednesday, Aug 11, 2010. AP / Musadeq Sadeq
ramadan_0811_24.jpg
An Afghan man prays after offering prayers on the first day of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan at a mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednesday, Aug 11, 2010. AP / Ahmad Massoud
ramadan_0811_25.jpg
Customers at a roadside shop sell a meat dish on the first day of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan in Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. AP / Mustafa Quraishi
ramadan_0811_26.jpg
A Palestinian man prepares “Qatayef”, traditional Arab pancakes, on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan on August 11, 2010 in Jerusalem’s old city. AFP/ Getty Images / Ahmad Gharabli
ramadan_0811_27.jpg
Palestinian men read the Koran at the al-Omri mosque in Gaza City on August 11, 2010 as Muslims mark the first day of the holy month of Ramadan. AFP/ Getty Images / MOHAMMED ABED Mohammed Abed
ramadan_0811_28.jpg
Lebanese “musaharati” Mohammed Fanas lights up a lantern before waking up observant Muslims for their overnight “suhur” meal before the day’s fast in the old city of the southern port of Sidon just before dawn on August 11, 2010 as Muslims in much of the Middle East begin the fasting month of Ramadan. AFP/ Getty Images / Mahmoud Zayat
ramadan_0811_29.jpg
A young Palestinian Muslim girl walks in an alley of Jerusalem’s old city holding a traditional Ramadan lantern while celebrating with other children the announcing of the holy month of Ramadan, Tuesday, Aug. 10 2010. Ramadan, when observant Muslims fast from dawn to dusk, will begin Wednesday. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
ramadan_0811_30.jpg
A Palestinian boy plays with fireworks to celebrate the holy month of Ramadan, in Gaza City, on August 10, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Mahmud Hams
ramadan_0811_31.jpg
Palestinian boys stand next to a shop, decorated with Ramadan festive lights, in the West Bank city of Nablus, Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010. AP / Nasser Ishtayeh
ramadan_0811_32.jpg
A Bahraini man points skyward at dusk Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010, in Hamad Town, Bahrain, towards where a slim crescent moon should be visible to indicate the start of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, a time of prayer, fasting and charitable giving. Clouds hampered skywatchers in the Persian Gulf island nation. AP / Hasan Jamali
ramadan_0811_33.jpg
Indonesian women pray during the first night of Ramadan in Jakarta on August 10, 2010. The fasting month of Ramadan, which starts on August 11, is the ninth month of the Muslim Hijri calendar, during which the faithful abstain from eating, drinking, smoking and having sex during daylight and, in the evening, eat small meals and conduct evening prayers. AFP/ Getty Images / Adek Berry
ramadan_0811_34.jpg
A worker dispalys cookies at a bakery ahead of Islam’s holy fasting month of Ramadan on August 10, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Sabah Arar
ramadan_0811_35.jpg
Indonesian Muslims offer an evening prayer called ‘Tarawih’, at the beginning of the holy fasting month of Ramadan at Istiqlal mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2010. AP / Achmad Ibrahim
ramadan_0811_36.jpg
A Palestinian blind boy reads a Quran Islam’s holy book, in braille in the West Bank city of Jenin, ahead the upcoming month of Ramadan, Monday, Aug. 9, 2010. AP / Mohammed Ballas
ramadan_0811_37.jpg
Afghan youths pray on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan on August 11, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Getty Images / Majid Saeedi

Read more: http://blogs.sacbee.com/photos/2010/08/ramadan-begins.html#more#ixzz12BMjn1YZ

La Comunidad Islámica en la Región de Murcia, por Teresa Martín

Imagenes de La Comunidad Islámica en la Región de Murcia

Niño en la Mezquita de San Pedro del Pinatar.

La fotografía permite informar, analizar y transformar.En su ejercicio debe prevalecer el componente ético, de implicación social y de voluntad de transformación.

El objetivo de este reportaje es  facilitar el conocimiento de las actividades de la Comunidad Islámica en la Región de Murcia al resto de ciudadanos, poner en valor sus culturas desde el respeto a las diferencias y creencias y dar visibilidad a sus lideres, sus comunidades y sus actividades.

En la Región de Murcia viven, trabajan y estudian cerca de 80.000 ciudadanos de religión islámica, algunos de nacionalidad española , otros de distintas nacionalidades y procedencias. De ellos 20.000 son niños en edad escolar.                                                                              La Comunidad Islámica de Murcia, constituye el segundo grupo religioso en cuanto número de fieles en nuestra Región, no obstante, y pese a su importancia, tiene serias dificultades para su práctica religiosa, abrir una mezquita provoca rechazo social en el entorno donde se ubica, los niños musulmanes no reciben clases  de religión islámica en las escuelas, y sus numerosas actividades son normalmente, puestas en entredicho por muchos ciudadanos, seguramente porque “aquello que se desconoce provoca rechazo”.

Los ciudadanos musulmanes forman una comunidad variada, plural , con diversos grados de integración, que mantienen sus tradiciones religiosas  y culturales . Los mas jóvenes de esta comunidad, han nacido aquí, hablan español como idioma materno y están educandose en los valores democráticos. Unos han llegado aquí como emigrantes, otros nacieron aquí y tienen DNI español, y otros son  autóctonos, bautizados como católicos pero convertidos al Islam. Ejercen profesiones diversas, hay profesores, médicos, enfermeras, farmaceúticos, abogados,periodistas, trabajadores sociales, albañiles, cocineras, estudiantes, campesinos,enlosadores,dependientes, comerciantes…
Las casi 60  mezquitas y oratorios, que existen en la región , no solamente son lugares de culto y rezo, tambien son de aprendizaje del árabe y del español, lugar de conferencias y encuentros, centros culturales y festivos.
Dos asociaciones representan a la mayoría de los musulmanes,FIRM, Federación Islámica de la Región de Murcia y UCIDE, Unión de Comunidades Islámicas de España.

Cuando inicié esta investigación partía de la voluntad de utilizar la imagen para mostrar otras realidades que normalmente no salen en las portadas de los periodicos, que se desconocen y que al no ser visibles públicamente, parece que no existen.

Mujeres musulmanas en la Universidad Popular de Lorca.Teresa Martín

La web Islam en Murcia, cumple en ese sentido un papel fundamental, y su impulsor y director ha sido la persona que ha facilitado el desarrollo de este reportaje. Paulino Ros, me ha abierto puertas, presentado personas y alentado en todo momento, sin él todo hubiera sido mas difícil.
No he tenido dificultades para realizar esta serie de imagenes, al contrario, excepto momentos y personas concretas, la cámara y yo nos hemos podido mover en libertad y sin cortapisas, tanto en el interior de las mezquitas como en centros culturales y en las distintas asociaciones.
La conversación, la charla tranquila, compartir un té o una comida ha sido mas importante que la toma de fotografías, eso viene después o no viene, depende del momento.
Nunca me plantee que por el hecho de ser mujer iba a encontrar impedimentos para realizar las fotos, y tampoco la Comunidad Islámica me los planteó. Nadie me ha pedido que me cubra la cabeza para entrar, alguien me dijo ” tu transmites respeto a nuestra cultura y a nuestra religión, nosotros te respetamos tal y como eres”
Detrás de cada una de las fotografias hay una historia, hay una conversación, una mirada.
En esta serie encontrareís a los lideres de la Comunidad Islámica, Ryay Tatary, Mounir Benjelloun, Mbarek Demmouche,Abderrahim Nachit,, Mohamed Reda el-Qady,Ana García Yepes (presidenta de la Asociación Al Baraka de Lorca), a los niños de la escuela de árabe, de UCIDE en Torre Pacheco, a las alumnas de español de la Universidad Popular de Lorca, a los niños, niñas y mujeres que participaron en el encuentro que la asociación ONDA organizó en el Centro Cultural de Los Dolores ( Cartagena), a fieles de las mezquitas de San Pedro del Pinatar y Los Dolores ( Cartagena)….variado, diverso, plural como la sociedad donde vivimos.
Me he encontrado con toda clase de personas, como en cualquier comunidad, pero son los niños quienes me han mirado mas libremente y con ojos confiados a la cámara y son ellos los que merecen no encontrar prejuicios y desconfianza en sus compañeros y vecinos. Es por ello que este reportaje acaba de iniciar su andadura.